OCD: Obsessive Corgi Disorder
Piper, who loves to Help in the Garden!

Piper, who loves to Help in the Garden!

Caught the goofball being serious.

Caught the goofball being serious.

lovemycorgi:

…sometimes you need a little assistance. #corgi #corgination #corginstagram #corgicommunity #corgisofinstagram #dogsofinstagram #petstagram #pembroke #ig #instacorgis #instagramcorgis #buzzfeed #buzzfeedanimals #barkpost #franklin #slccorgis #utahcorgis

lovemycorgi:

…sometimes you need a little assistance. #corgi #corgination #corginstagram #corgicommunity #corgisofinstagram #dogsofinstagram #petstagram #pembroke #ig #instacorgis #instagramcorgis #buzzfeed #buzzfeedanimals #barkpost #franklin #slccorgis #utahcorgis

corgiaday:

Yaaaah dats da spot.

corgiaday:

Yaaaah dats da spot.

derpincogri:

Pool time!

littlebitofbrynn:

cooperdacorgi:

Dat ear doe.

This!

littlebitofbrynn:

cooperdacorgi:

Dat ear doe.

This!

because everybody loves cute corgis, have a brand new webcomic about an adorable little corgi with a wonderfully positive outlook on everything

"Hi! Pet me now please!"
Submitted by Joey’s mom

"Hi! Pet me now please!"

Submitted by Joey’s mom

Elly napping after a hard fought battle with Duck.
submitted by @IntentionalProduce

Elly napping after a hard fought battle with Duck.

submitted by @IntentionalProduce

walking in the park/公園さんぽ

walking in the park/公園さんぽ

Corgi Addict loves all things corgi related, and loves it even more when readers/viewers submit their stumpers for sharing.
We get a lot of questions like this, and while we’re very enthusiastic about all things corgi…we’re not vets.  Or licensed dog trainers.  
While we may occasionally offer advice, your best bet in anything related to the health & well-being of your pup is to consult your vet.  If you got your corgi from a responsible breeder, they are also excellent sources of information and corgi-related advice.  We would hate for a corgi to suffer due to misinformation or lack of action.  
As for breeders, Corgi Addict is not affiliated with nor do we endorse any breeders for Pembroke or Cardigan Welsh Corgis.  As for how to approach a breeder, a number of CAs actually have corgis they got from breeders, so we know a little about that.  However, the same approach can generally be taken with shelter/rescue dogs as well.
Here are some helpful hints;
Some breeders are “old school,” so no, you won’t necessarily a very helpful and informative website with everything you want to know outlined.  Some breeders have websites, but they’re woefully trapped in 1998 and you can only take so much comic sans and animated MAIL icons… it’s a mixed bag.  
E-mail is a good idea, the PWCCA (or CWCCA) website is your best bet for starting the search for responsible breeders, as these organizations prohibit the sale of corgis to pet stores, and essentially do not include back yard breeders.  If they have an e-mail, definitely send an inquiry.
Referring back to the limited web presence, your better bet may be to actually place a phone call.  You would be surprised how many “yo, i want a corgi, how much?” e-mails and phone calls breeders get. And how many blowoffs by non-serious inquirers.
Research the breed, be prepared to ask plenty of questions and demonstrate your knowledge/preparedness for a future corgi, and to answer questions the breeder will ask of you.
Here is a Corgi Inquiry form one of the CAs used when researching her future corgi.  These are the types of questions every breeder was asked, and every good breeder will a.) totally be prepared to answer these questions and b.) be pleased that you are interested enough to ask.  Be wary of a breeder that balks at answering your questions.
For those interested in adopting/rescuing a corgi, definitely follow up your e-mails with a phone call. Shelters/rescues get SO MANY INQUIRIES that go no where, so many dogs that people are interested in only to have no follow through.  Show you mean it, show you’re committed.
Be prepared to DEFINITELY answer questions about your lifestyle, your home, your other pets, your income, references, etc.  Shelters and rescue organizations have to be very careful with placing animals to the point of being almost too strict.  It’s because they want the dog to find it’s true forever home with someone that’s serious, and not have to be back at square one with the same animal in another 6 months.
For adoption/breeders/etc. try to schedule visits for both!  Visit shelters, visit rescue orgs, visit breeders once, twice, more if you can! When the litter arrives, try to visit a few times if you can to meet your future puppy.  Also, some rescue orgs may require home visits of your house, to investigate how prepped you are for a puppy.  
Also, you can get older/retired dogs from breeders.  Some take in rescue, some retire show dogs or breeding dogs and need to place adult corgis in homes.  These corgis are fantastic dogs that make wonderful pets.  So while we do agree that backyard breeders, puppy mills, and pet shops are NOT places to get your future stumpy companion; we do not prefer adoption/rescue over breeders or vice versa (so long as they are quality, responsible breeders).
and lastly, http://bit.ly/VjvGBV
Good luck!

Corgi Addict loves all things corgi related, and loves it even more when readers/viewers submit their stumpers for sharing.

We get a lot of questions like this, and while we’re very enthusiastic about all things corgi…we’re not vets.  Or licensed dog trainers.  

While we may occasionally offer advice, your best bet in anything related to the health & well-being of your pup is to consult your vet.  If you got your corgi from a responsible breeder, they are also excellent sources of information and corgi-related advice.  We would hate for a corgi to suffer due to misinformation or lack of action.  

As for breeders, Corgi Addict is not affiliated with nor do we endorse any breeders for Pembroke or Cardigan Welsh Corgis.  As for how to approach a breeder, a number of CAs actually have corgis they got from breeders, so we know a little about that.  However, the same approach can generally be taken with shelter/rescue dogs as well.

Here are some helpful hints;

  • Some breeders are “old school,” so no, you won’t necessarily a very helpful and informative website with everything you want to know outlined.  Some breeders have websites, but they’re woefully trapped in 1998 and you can only take so much comic sans and animated MAIL icons… it’s a mixed bag.  
  • E-mail is a good idea, the PWCCA (or CWCCA) website is your best bet for starting the search for responsible breeders, as these organizations prohibit the sale of corgis to pet stores, and essentially do not include back yard breeders.  If they have an e-mail, definitely send an inquiry.
  • Referring back to the limited web presence, your better bet may be to actually place a phone call.  You would be surprised how many “yo, i want a corgi, how much?” e-mails and phone calls breeders get. And how many blowoffs by non-serious inquirers.
  • Research the breed, be prepared to ask plenty of questions and demonstrate your knowledge/preparedness for a future corgi, and to answer questions the breeder will ask of you.
  • Here is a Corgi Inquiry form one of the CAs used when researching her future corgi.  These are the types of questions every breeder was asked, and every good breeder will a.) totally be prepared to answer these questions and b.) be pleased that you are interested enough to ask.  Be wary of a breeder that balks at answering your questions.
  • For those interested in adopting/rescuing a corgi, definitely follow up your e-mails with a phone call. Shelters/rescues get SO MANY INQUIRIES that go no where, so many dogs that people are interested in only to have no follow through.  Show you mean it, show you’re committed.
  • Be prepared to DEFINITELY answer questions about your lifestyle, your home, your other pets, your income, references, etc.  Shelters and rescue organizations have to be very careful with placing animals to the point of being almost too strict.  It’s because they want the dog to find it’s true forever home with someone that’s serious, and not have to be back at square one with the same animal in another 6 months.
  • For adoption/breeders/etc. try to schedule visits for both!  Visit shelters, visit rescue orgs, visit breeders once, twice, more if you can! When the litter arrives, try to visit a few times if you can to meet your future puppy.  Also, some rescue orgs may require home visits of your house, to investigate how prepped you are for a puppy.  
  • Also, you can get older/retired dogs from breeders.  Some take in rescue, some retire show dogs or breeding dogs and need to place adult corgis in homes.  These corgis are fantastic dogs that make wonderful pets.  So while we do agree that backyard breeders, puppy mills, and pet shops are NOT places to get your future stumpy companion; we do not prefer adoption/rescue over breeders or vice versa (so long as they are quality, responsible breeders).

and lastly, http://bit.ly/VjvGBV

Good luck!

submitted by: Julia

It’s SHARK WEEK starting on August 10th and Frankie the Fluffy Corgi decided to join in! Check him out as he hunts his bunny toy in this vicious and cute one.

Submitted by Daniel Vedamuthu and Frankie the Fluffy Corgi

The infamous Stump arrooooooooooooo!

submitted by jrive017

Turbo the Corgi hears something in the distance… turbothecorgi.tumblr.com

Turbo the Corgi hears something in the distance… turbothecorgi.tumblr.com